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. "state of the union" with candy crowley begins right now. >>> i'm dana bash in for candy crowley with breaking news we're following out of syria. a u.s. official tells cnn there's very little doubt that the assad government used chemical weapons against civilians. syria's government today said it will allow u.n. weapons inspectors to investigate the site where the alleged attack occurred on wednesday. the syrian government denies responsibility and is blaming rebels for the attack that reportedly killed 1300 people. now the incident is testing already-frayed relations between the united states and russia, which is warning the u.s. not to jump to conclusions about the syrian government. meanwhile, the pentagon has prepositioned four warships armed with cruise missiles in the region. joining me now is cnn's pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence, and cnn international correspondent, phil black live in moscow and cnn's fred platkin in damascus. fred, to you first. >> hi, dana. i had an interview earlier today with the deputy foreign minister of syria, who told me that the u.n. weapo
be, are not up for debate. cnn's dana bash, our chief congressional correspondent, joins me now. when you look at history, dana, it shows that presidents -- just a reminder. u i any you know this. presidents can launch military action without approval from congress. grenada, '83. pan na, '89. iraq, '91. haiti, '94. kosovo, '99. why a briefing in a couple of hours, dana bash? >> reporter: in short, politics. members of congress, even natural allies of president obama have been demanding coordination. tonight 6:00 p.m. this evening secretaries of state and defense and others will hold a conference call with president obama and other key committee heads to discuss the nation's posture on syria. what's interesting is that lawmakers are not here. they are still back in their states, in their districts on congressional recess. since they're all over the country, some will be on their cell phones. it is not going to be a secure line. meaning it can't be classified. it's going to be an unclassified conversation. one source who's going to be on the call who i talked to kind of rolled his eyes
targets in syria. our chief congressional correspondent dana bash is joining us on the phone. i've got through this letter. i know you have as well. he's raising all sorts of questions, this speaker. >> reporter: all sorts of questions, very specific questions about not just what kind of military action might the administration use, but more specifically what kind of information would they be basing this on, with regard to chemical weapons. what's very interesting about this letter is a couple things, first of all, the speaker make pretty clear that he agrees with the administration that syria is a very important area in national securitywise, and that he supports being aggressive with regard to potential for chemical weapons. he also says this -- i respectfully request that you as the country's commander in chief personally make the indication to the american people and congress for how potential military action will security american national security, and he goes on to say preserve america's credibility and deter the future use of chemical weapons. what he's trying to do here is kin
. jim acosta is covering events for us at the white house while dana bash is in our washington bureau. and, jim, the timing of this decision simply fascinating and based on what you're hearing, really last minute. >> very much so, john. this was a very dramatic development that took place here at the white house yesterday after his administration was essentially moving in the direction of eminent military action, perhaps as soon as this weekend. the president made a different decision. at 7:00 last night he really made a last-minute decision to slow down, buy himself some time, and seek authorization from congress. according to senior administration officials who explained how all of this played out to a group of reporters, within the last hour, it sort of takes a little bit of time to explain but it's worth listening to. at first the story first starts, according to the senior administration officials, that this option of seeking directional approval was not really talked about among his top advisers. it was something just just really kicking around inside the president's head, accor
on the complex political situation facing the president, i want to bring in dana milbank, political columnist for the "washington post." you just heard andrea mitchell talk about the fact you have this president who came into office, elected in large part getting that democratic nomination because of his caution, but this thing is moving, this train's going in one direction, and that's toward military action. >> that's right. he opposed iraq as a dumb war, but by his own terms, he's left himself absolutely no choice here because he said famously that this was the red line. the use of chemical weapons and if there had been any doubt before, his administration has erased that today. it has to be a very serious response, and as andrea was discussing, the only real question is whether it is this surge cal strike or a more intensive air campaign against the syrian regime. nobody's talking about anything beyond air power at this point. the only certainty we have is that whatever this president does, he's going to be criticized for it for doing too much for doing too little, for going with the unite
congressional correspondent dana bash. dana, you have new information, as well. >> we've been talking about the fact that senators mccain, john mccain and lindsey graham released a statement, pretty hard-hitting statement, saying that they're very concerned about action being limited, as barbara was just talking about. i just got off the phone with senator graham to try to clarify if this means that he would actually vote against authorization if it would just authorize limited military force. what he told me is that they would only get his vote if, never mind how the authorization resolution was written, but if they -- in addition to that, gave him and other members of congress very clear timeline, explanation of what they blplano do afterwards, he and senator mccain has been focused on trying to train and harm rebels who are trustworthy in that area. he wants to have very clear information about that and if he doesn't, it will be hard for him to vote yes. why is this important? because he and mccain have been perhaps the most aggressive ong saying there needs to be action. he told me in a
. this came during a meeting with a delegation of syrian expatriates. dana bash is joining us on the phone. we know there have been some conference calls between the white house and republicans and democrats. what are you hearing? >> that's right. they're going to take place our understanding is in a couple hours with at least on the senate side with republicans and democrats, but we also just learned that tomorrow, that's sunday, the white house is offering or at least administration officials are offering to come to capitol hill on a sunday to offer a classified briefing on the intelligence that the u.s. has on syria's chemical weapons to any and all members who are in town. sunday is labor day weekend. unclear how many will be able to make it in but it's significant for several reasons. one is that members of congress have been real chomping at the bit to get, understandably, to get information in a classified way that makes them feel comfortable that any kind of military strikes would be justified, but also this is just tea leaf reading here, it might be questionable whether or not they wo
's begin, though, with your chief congressional correspondent, dana bash. she has details of the syria conference call with members of conference -- members of congress going on right now. da dana, what do we know? >> we know that it has begun and this is good news for lawmakers, who have been really asking the obama administration for more information, was we have pretty heavy hitters, the secretaries of defense and state, as you said. other officials, talking to congressional leaders and key committee heads of both parties. that's the good news for them. the bad news for these lawmakers is that obama officials are going to be limited in what they can say, because they're going to be talking, or are as we speak, on a phone line that is not secure. so what that means is that they're going to be able to discuss only unclassified information. and that could rule out what many of these lawmakers really want to know. what the intelligence the administration has the to back claims about assad using chemical weapons, not to mention military options for strikes against the syrian regime. that
, again the only television reporter currently there. we are lucky to have him there. >>> dana bash reporters that the intelligence report on sir yaw was delivered to key members of congress yet. we are still waiting for a public release, so the question is how close is the u.s. at taking military action in syria, and how will syrian presidnt assad respond. let's bring in andrew tabler, an expert on syria and the assad family, a senior fellow at the washington institute. in new york, chris tore harmer, the senior naval analyst at the institution for the study of war. he thorred a study last might that surgical strikes could de -- at a relatively small cost, but says using the air strikes is counterproductive. chris, i want to start with you. i want to read a quote from "los angeles times" today. one u.s. official who as briefed on the options on syria said he bled the white house would seek a level of intense legitimate just muscular numb not to be mocked, but not so devastating -- you're looking at what is just enough to mean something, just enough to be more than sim bo bowlic, he
the president, but i want to bring in dana bash right now. there's a series of briefings being laid out by the administration. declassified briefings over the phone. and classified briefings tomorrow for those members who are in washington. say most members are back in their districts or traveling or some place else during this labor day weekend, congress is not in session. do we anticipate many members coming back to washington tomorrow to have access to that classified information? >> i believe that that is entirely possible, but before we talk about the briefings, i wanted to give you a little bit of news and that is you know, we've seen a series of statements from members of congress on their view on what the president should and shouldn't do. we wrus got a statement from senator john cornyn, republican of texas, the number two republican in the united states senate who is now calling on the president to bring congress back into session and ask for a vote on authorization to use force before any military action is taken in syria. now, we've seen calls like this from many members of
to washington to our chief congressional correspondent, dana bash for more on what members of congress -- i know it's quiet in some parts of washington because many members of congress are still away on recess. we know that they were briefed via teleconference in that unsecure line so it wasn't classified, per se, last night. they've been speaking, i'm sure, with the administration today. what are you hearing? >> reporter: that's exactly right. i think a lot of what is going on as we speak is box checking by the administration. making sure that they speak to the key committees. last night what happened was secretary kerry, hagel and others spoke to the chair apd ranking members as well as the leadership in both bodies of congress. right now maybe even as we speak, there is a series of calls going from the national security council to the actual rank and file members of some of those key committees. so they are effectively, for lack of a better way to say, giving them a little love which members of congress always want from any administration, but especially as we've heard very loudly from some o
analyst gloria borger and chief congressional correspondent dana bash. the president hasn't made a final decision but everyone knows he has decided he is going to go ahead and launch some sort of strike against targets in syria. >> at this point it's not if but when. i think when you hear the president speak that way, it's clear he's got a lot of options on the table and maybe he was still deciding about a particular option, but i think you would have to assume given the fact that what we saw today was pretty much of a roll-out, first from the secretary and then the president himself. there was a background briefing for journalists with senior administration officials talking about the evidence on chemical weapons. they're clearly making their case. now the issue has been decided in great britain. they made a point of saying that they've got france and turkey with them. so i think what we're seeing is the beginning of the explanation of why they're going to go in -- >> they may have france and turkey's verbal support but i don't see any military hardware other than u.s. military hardware
that ft. leavenworth will do that. it looks like dana coombs will have to sue the army or petition on medical grounds to get bradley manning transferred to a federal prison where perhaps he could get that therapy because due to army and d.o.d. regulations, ft. leaven swort not going to give that hormone therapy much less sex reassignment surgery. carol? >> if he did get this treatment, this hormone replacement therapy, who would pay for it? >> it would be the government. it would be the taxpayers. that's the way it is for any prisoner. basically, if you're a prisoner, the state or the government is responsible for your medical care because you can't fund your own medical care. there have been some rulings in the past where federal courts have struck down laws in which some states try to prohibit these taxpayer-funded hormone therapy regimens. again, some of the courts have struck those down saying you can't do that. and some prisoners have been receiving hormone therapy. sexual reassignment surgery is still relatively new. that also has been looked on somewhat favorably by some of
. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics, including israeli and israeli palestinian peace talks. these makers is sunday on c-span at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. >> we wrote this about a year and a half ago, it's called 10 letters. it's letters that president obama reads and i went back and found 10 of them who had written to the president. it has been a pretty good read. when that is done, then we go on to act of congress and another guy at "the washington post" and back in the 1970s there was a big difference between then and now it is just that these guys have written. collision 2012 is written and there was a similar writing back in the 2008 campaign. all the guys involved, and that is coming out in august. the other one is through the perilous fight, which is by steve bulger, also someone i used to work with closely. we look back at the six weeks during the war of 1812. >> we saw the movie. two let us know what you are reading this summer. post
obama. up next, "newsmakers" with california congressman, dana rohrabacher on u.s. russia relations and al qaeda's continued threat abroad. then the second annual family leadership conference with remarks by rick santorum and donald trump. after that, president obama's speaking to disabled in orlando, florida. with aq and a" washington post investigative >> our guest this week is dana rohrabacher. he has responsibilities for issues involving russia and also looks at emerging threats. after the big decisions about u.s./russian relations in the summit, we thought it important to speak to him. let me introduce our reporters, guy taylor. blake houshell is the deputy editor of politico. >> my first quonon
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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